Saturday, November 03, 2007

A Good Fence Makes a Dog Friendly Garden

They say "Good fences make good neighbors" I say "A good fence makes a dog friendly garden"

A cedar fence with a mixture of board widths is especially attractive

There are many choices when it comes to fencing materials. Cost, appearance, local codes & restrictions, & function all need to be considered. One also needs to consider the personality of the dogs being fenced in, or, out.A split rail fence requires a backing of wire farm fence to make it secure

Our dogs would do best with a solid fence or wall; they are great hunters and are frustrated when they see a critter on the other side of the fence, and the dogs next door tease them into fighting through the fence. Unfortunately our budget does not allow us to replace the perfectly sturdy chain link fence our property came with. While I dream of a six foot tall masonry wall with gorgeous gates, I make do with what we have. We are growing a dense layer of plants against the fence to make it difficult for the dogs to see through, plus it hides the less than attractive fence from my view. We have placed a short picket fence along the fence shared by the neighbor dogs as an extra barrier.

A tall brick wall is handsome & secure

Invisible or radio fences have a place in the landscape, but I don't think they should be used for security. While they might keep your dog confined, it won't keep other dogs, coyotes, or strange people away from your dog. These fences should be used in conjunction with a physical fence; they can be used to keep the dog out of part of the landscape, or even indoors to keep the dog out of certain areas. If you live in a neighborhood that won't allow permanent fencing, consider portable fencing or an exercise pen.
Berry & Basil sit in front of their picket fence, still waiting for a coat of paint.

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